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Documents You Print Secretly Contain Your Identity

Since the 1980s all laser printers secretly encode your identity onto every piece of paper you print from them.

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I bought an HP printer from NewEgg and I cannot fathom how this could be possible, since the printer was already manufactured and in a warehouse before I bought it.  So from David Icke's site:

"I'm calling bullshit on this one. Having worked in various areas of the printing industry for 5 years, I've examined hundreds if not thousands of printouts more closely than most people ever will. I have never noticed anything out of the ordinary as far as "microdots," much less heard of something as ridiculous as this. Moreover, until recently (within the last few years) the VAST majority of consumer laser printers were quite literally incapable of printing a dot so small as to be invisible to the naked eye. The advances in print resolution are just now getting to the point where that's even possible. To say this was going on back in the '80s is a fucking farce. To say ALL laser printers do this is even more laughable. I don't know where Mark Dice got the idea that there's a database where printer serial numbers are connected to names and credit card numbers. That's just goddamn ludicrous.

And another thing... The way laser printers work makes this impractical. Over time, the cartridge roller and printing drum both get worn through repeated heating and cooling. The coating flakes off, making the toner stick in places where it shouldn't, thus getting transfered to the printed page. This inevitable occurrence would obscure any "secret code" printed on the page in magical microdots.

Now, maybe the printers the government uses are capable of this. I do not know. Consumer laser printers? Not a chance."  http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=231866

I was told by a guy in the military who went to classes on military intelligence about what he learned.  He told me that the Murrah Building could have been taken down by a softball sized piece of plastic explosive (this sort of gets verfied in the following article http://mybigfatanti-zionistlife.blogspot.com/2012/11/9-11-and-october-...

So, IMO, thermite and plastic explosive would have been enough to bring down the WTC.  No nukes or Judy Wood needed.

He also said that there are machines that can read fingerprints off xerox copies - for example, if you handle a paper, make a copy of it, and do not handle the copy, your prints can still be read (on the copy) by a machine that was developed for this purpose. 

Getting back to printers, I have read that they are trackable, not because of encoding a person's address, but because of dot patterns that get laid down on the paper.  See http://33bits.org/2011/10/18/printer-dotspervasive-tracking-and-the-tr...  This, I assume, would make a printer traceable to a particular credit card number, but if the printer was bought second hand, or with cash, it's sort of useless. 

I am assuming the guy in the vid is Mark Dice - typical sloppy conspiracy reporting. 

You quoted from David Icke's site...

"I'm calling bullshit on this one. Having worked in various areas of the printing industry for 5 years, I've examined hundreds if not thousands of printouts more closely than most people ever will. I have never noticed anything out of the ordinary as far as "microdots," much less heard of something as ridiculous as this. Moreover, until recently (within the last few years) the VAST majority of consumer laser printers were quite literally incapable of printing a dot so small as to be invisible to the naked eye.

Over ten years ago I had a colour laser printer capable of printing 1200 dots per inch. Is the author of this comment seriously suggesting it is possible to 'see' a single dot 1/1200th of an inch in size? Particularly when that dot is nestled amongst many other dots of the same size. Even at the relatively low resolution of 300 dpi, it is next to impossible to pick out one dot from another.

A further quote from the same source...

And another thing... The way laser printers work makes this impractical. Over time, the cartridge roller and printing drum both get worn through repeated heating and cooling. The coating flakes off, making the toner stick in places where it shouldn't, thus getting transfered to the printed page. This inevitable occurrence would obscure any "secret code" printed on the page in magical microdots.

The microdot code is not just printed in one location. It is printed multiple times on a single page. Chances are that if a printer was worn out to the extent described above, the rollers and drum would have been replaced before things got so bad that all evidence of the encoded dots was obscured.

Getting back to printers, I have read that they are trackable, not because of encoding a person's address, but because of dot patterns that get laid down on the paper. This, I assume, would make a printer traceable to a particular credit card number, but if the printer was bought second hand, or with cash, it's sort of useless. 

Yes, it encodes the printer's serial number and the date/time the printing took place. As you say, if you bought a printer second-hand it is next to useless. If you used a printer in a public place, it is also practically next to useless. If your printer is third or fourth hand, it is useless. The official story behind these encoded dots is that they were introduced to prevent counterfeiting of our worthless fiat currency, which in itself is laughable.

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